Skip to main content
Home
The Kennedy Center

Must-See Fall Shows You Can Enjoy In-Person in Washington, DC

Return to DC theaters for these can’t-miss performances

As DC theaters reopen, make sure to mark your calendar with this array of highly anticipated productions set to debut this fall. When you plan your visit, check out each theater’s health and safety precautions so you can have the safest experience possible.

 

The Amen Corner – Sept. 14-26
From the brilliant mind of the late James Baldwin comes this acclaimed play directed by Whitney White, which will reside at Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Sidney Harman Hall for a short two-week engagement. The Amen Corner concerns Pastor Margaret, who runs a small storefront church in Harlem in the 1950s. Margaret cries out against the vices of her sons and congregation, but faces her own personal struggle when memories of her troubled past return. Filled with uproarious gospel songs, the acclaimed production serves as an outstanding re-entry to in-person theater enjoyment.
Tickets
Sidney Harman Hall, 610 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

My Lord, What a Night – Oct. 1-24
This drama based on the real-life friendship between Marian Anderson and Albert Einstein will light up the stage at Ford’s Theatre this October. Based on true events, My Lord, What a Night details the impetus of a kinship between a legendary contralto and perhaps the most famous physicist to ever live. After a performance in Princeton, New Jersey, Anderson is denied lodging because she is Black. Einstein invites her to his home, and the narrative imagines conversations that led to Anderson’s historic concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.
Tickets
Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

Remember This: The Lesson of Jan Karski – Oct. 6-17
Academy Award nominee David Strathairn delivers a staggering solo performance in this production coming to Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Michael R. Klein Theatre at the Lansburgh. Strathairn plays Jan Karski, a witness to the Holocaust and a World War II hero. Karski risked life and limb to travel to the Oval Office from war-torn Poland to tell his story, only to be disbelieved. The one-man show of courage and persistence will leave you stunned.
Tickets
Michael R. Klein Theatre at the Lansburgh, 450 7th Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

Celia and Fidel – Oct. 8 – Nov. 21
Celia Sánchez was the most trusted advisor of one Fidel Castro, always by his side as he mulled how to improve his Cuban homeland. Celia and Fidel is set in 1980, as 10,000 Cuban citizens seek asylum at the Peruvian Embassy. Castro must decide, through an intense conversation with the revolutionary Celia, whether he wants to be mighty or merciful. Magical realism is woven into this captivating tale that ruminates on the battle between power and morality.
Tickets
Arena Stage, 1101 6th Street SW, Washington, DC 20024

 

Hadestown – Oct. 13-31
Winner of eight 2019 Tony Awards (including Best Musical) and the 2020 Grammy Award for Best Musical Theater Album, Hadestown combines the tales of Orpheus and Eurydice and King Hades and his wife, Persephone, into an epic musical love story. Acclaimed singer-songwriter Anaïs Mitchell and director Rachel Chavkin have created a masterpiece that must be seen at the Kennedy Center to be believed.
Tickets
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566

 

Ronald K. Brown/EVIDENCE and Meshell Ndegeocello – Oct. 21-23
Visionary choreographer Ronald K. Brown teams up with vocalist, composer and bassist Meshell Ndegeocello to bring this cutting edge production to Kennedy Center’s Eisenhower Theater. This performance will feature three works, including a co-commission with the Kennedy Center, a rendition of a masterful 1999 piece for the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and a new work by Brown.
Tickets
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566

 

N – Oct. 23 – Nov. 20
The Keegan Theatre hosts the regional premiere of this fascinating historical drama by Adrienne Pender. Based on a true story, N takes you back to 1921, when Eugene O’Neill’s The Emperor Jones became the first American play to feature a Black actor in the lead role on Broadway. That actor, Charles S. Gilpin, rose to stardom, along with O’Neill. Just five years later, the latter was a legend, while the former was lost to history. Gilpin wanted O’Neill to remove the n-word from the play; O’Neill refused, leading to Gilpin’s removal from the role. Don’t miss this thought-provoking look at the history of racism in American theater.
Tickets
Keegan Theatre, 1742 Church Street NW, Washington, DC 20036

 

Come Home: A Celebration of Return – Nov. 6-14
Marvel at this Washington National Opera presentation that will mark the return of in-person programming and the Kennedy Center’s 50th anniversary season. The star-studded cast includes Pretty Yende, Isabel Leonard, Lawrence Brownlee and Alexandria Shiner. Come Home will feature a soaring musical tribute to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, as well as renditions of Rossini’s William Tell, Verdi’s Nabucco and Wagner’s Tannhäuser.
Tickets
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566

 

Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! The Musical – Nov. 23 – Dec. 5
Yes, this is a fall preview, but we’d be remiss if we didn’t include this first taste of Christmas time, with performances set to begin at the National Theatre on Nov. 23 (two days before Thanksgiving). One of the most revered holiday stories in American history comes to musical life. All the hit songs – “You’re A Mean One, Mr. Grinch,” “Welcome Christmas,” etc. – will be performed, as audiences are again dazzled by Dr. Seuss’ classic tale and the play’s awesome costumes and scenery.
Tickets
The National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20004

Partner Content
Partner Content