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NATIONAL CHERRY BLOSSOM FESTIVAL

80+ Things to Do This March in Washington, DC

Experience spring in DC and can’t-miss events like Awesome Con, the National Cherry Blossom Festival, the Events DC Embassy Chef Challenge and the ACC Men’s Basketball Tournament along with new museum exhibits, plays, concerts and shows.

Make plans for unforgettable experiences in the nation's capital this March and throughout 2024. After you’ve read through this list, make sure to check out our things to do for the week and weekend as well as our accessibility guides to monuments and museums on the National Mall.

Sponsored by Hilton

Sponsored by Hilton

Stay at a hotel by Hilton, the premier hotel provider for the 2024 National Cherry Blossom Festival
Cherry blossom season in DC is a sight to behold, and Hilton puts you right in the heart of the action with more than 100 properties to choose from. Experience the height of luxury at Waldorf Astoria Washington DC, where you can indulge in a delightful cherry-blossom themed afternoon tea. For those seeking downtown sophistication, Conrad Washington DC offers an elegant retreat, while Embassy Suites by Hilton Washington DC Convention Center provides a welcoming atmosphere for you and your furry friends. Many Hilton properties are offering special packages with complimentary cocktails, food and beverage credits and much more.
Book at Hilton.com/CherryBlossoms
 

BlackGirlsRock!Fest – Feb. 29 – March 9
For the fifth year, the Kennedy Center hosts a festival and immersive experience  in honor of Black women artists, thinkers and creatives. Curated by BLACK GIRLS ROCK!™CEO and founder Beverly Bond, the beloved festival activates Women’s History Month all over the Kennedy Center campus with dance parties, live music, comedy shows and much more.
More Info
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566
 

Agave Festival – Feb. 29 – March 17
José Andrés’ Oyamel Cocina Mexicana goes all out over agave this time each year, with 2024 going to another level in its celebration of the spirit. The festival features more than two weeks of events including a kick-off party on Feb. 29 and a chef’s counter cocktail experience on March 5 and 6. Oyamel will also offer specialty cocktails and food specials.
More Info & Tickets
Oyamel Cocina Mexicana, 401 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

 Vietnam Women's Memorial

Celebrate Women’s History Month in DC
DC celebrates the contributions of women all year long with food and drink spots and women-inspired museums, exhibits and attractions. In addition, the city honors Women's History Month with an outstanding and varied collection of events, exhibits, plays and programming that highlights the accomplishments, art and stories of women.
 

Washington Capitals

Grab discounted tickets and attend a Capitals, Wizards or Go-Go game
With the winter season comes incredible indoor sports action in the District. The NHL’s Washington Capitals and the NBA’s Washington Wizards play their exciting games inside Capital One Arena, while the Capital City Go-Go, part of the NBA’s developmental G-League, take to the court inside Entertainment & Sports Arena. You can purchase discounted tickets to games for all three teams at the links below.
Caps Ticket Discount (and free hat with purchase)
Wizards Ticket Discount (up to 20% off)
Go-Go Ticket Discount (up to 25% off)
 

Star Power: Photographs from Hollywood’s Golden Age by George Hurrell – March 1 – Jan. 5, 2025
Hollywood’s premiere photographer during the onset of the studio system, George Hurrell set the template for how to capture the brightest stars of the cinematic universe. As MGM’s in-house portraitist and in his own studio, Hurrell used lighting expertise and the sharpest of eyes to create glamorous images of Greta Garbo, Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy and many, many more. The National Portrait Gallery displays many of these Golden Era photographs in the new exhibit.
11:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Portrait Gallery, 8th and G Streets NW, Washington, DC 20001
 

Bond In Motion – March 1 – April 2025
Across more than six decades of films, James Bond has become the on-screen embodiment of spies for millions. The International Spy Museum pays homage to the fictional character, along with his allies and adversaries, with a breathtaking display of iconic vehicles from the movies. In total, visitors can fix their eyes on 17 pieces, including cars, motorcycles, submarines and even more from the Q Branch Garage. 
Hours & Admission
International Spy Museum, 700 L’Enfant Plaza SW, Washington, DC 20024
 

Through the Sunken Lands – March 2-17
The Kennedy Center presents a family-friendly play that makes for a perfect outing during Women’s History Month. Through the Sunken Lands follows Artemis, whose town of Arcady has been destroyed by a flood, forcing her to take up residence in the local library. She sets out to find her way back to Aunt Maggie’s house but discovers a committee intent on taking over the town. From there, a spellbinding adventure unfolds as Artemis, Aunt Maggie and even a talking heron rebuild Arcady from the ground up.
Tickets
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566
 

Bonnard’s Worlds – March 2 – June 2
The first major retrospective of the work of Pierre Bonard at the Phillips Collection in 20 years, Bonnard’s Worlds opens new avenues for exploring the mind and surroundings of the French artist. Some of the most celebrated works by the master have been brought together from museums across Europe and the U.S. and from private collections worldwide for an exhibition that highlights how Bonnard translated the spaces around him, from Parisian landscapes to the interior spaces of his dwellings and thoughts.
Hours & Admission
The Phillips Collection, 1600 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20009
 

Striking Objects: Contemporary Japanese Metalwork – March 2 – Early 2026
The National Museum of Asian Art’s new exhibit highlights works from the collection of Shirley Z. Johnson (1940–2021), a lawyer, philanthropist and former board member of the museum whose donation of Japanese metalworks created the largest collection in the United States. Visitors can observe contemporary pieces that revive and innovate traditional methods that have been passed down and practiced over generations.
10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Museum of Asian Art, 1050 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20560
 

National Museum of Women in the Arts

Free Community Days at the National Museum of Women in the Arts – March 3 & 13
The renovated and expanded National Museum of Women in the Arts welcomes visitors back with free admission twice each month. Reacquaint yourself with one of the coolest art collections in the District without paying a cent during Women’s History Month. You’ll have some extra cash left over to explore the museum’s jaw-dropping gift shop.
Register
National Museum of Women in the Arts, 1250 New York Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20005
 

Mock Trial – March 5
Shakespeare Theatre Company stages a mock trial of … well, Shakespearean proportions every year at Harman Hall. The 2024 edition transports the audience to the highest appellate court in Scotland, where Macbeth and his wife will stand trial for the murder of King Duncan with his son, Malcolm, in attendance. The “Advocates” will be CNN Senior Legal Analyst Elie Honig and MSNBC’s Katie Phang, with a panel of residing judges that includes U.S. Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett.
7:30 p.m. |  Tickets
Harman Hall, 610 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004
 

Tedeschi Trucks Band – March 5-7
Formed by married couple Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks (nephew of Butch Trucks, original drummer for The Allman Brothers Band), Tedeschi Trucks Band sees the duo dueling on electric guitar with Tedeschi on vocals accompanied by a rollicking backing band. Their searing take on American blues is adored by fans and critics alike. Catch the Grammy-winning act during a three-night run at DC’s Warner Theatre.
Tickets
Warner Theatre, 513 13th Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

The Book of Mormon – March 5-17
One of the most acclaimed musicals of all-time is a Tony Award-winning tale of two Mormon missionaries in Africa penned by the kings of irreverence, Trey Parker and Matt Stone (creators of South Park). Watch two knuckleheads stagger through misadventures and awkward situations as they attempt to spread the Word. The National Theatre hosts the hilarious production.
Tickets
The National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20004
 

Penelope – March 5 – April 21
It’s time for a new perspective on the Trojan War. Signature Theatre hosts the DC premiere of Penelope, in which the wife of Odysseus takes center stage. She steps into the spotlight, glass of bourbon and microphone in hand, to detail the 20 years she spent waiting on the island of Ithaca in a one-woman show. This musical spin on Greek tragedy is unlike anything else you’ll see on a stage this season.
Tickets
Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Avenue, Arlington, VA 22206
 

Sydney Vernon – March 6 – June 6
Local artist and native of the DC region Sydney Vernon receives an in-depth showcase at Phillips@THEARC, which does not charge admission. Vernon’s idiosyncratic approach sees her superimpose and alter family photos with both authentic and imagined stories from Black history and culture. Her work pairs perfectly with Pierre Bonard’s, which will be on display over at the Phillps Collection.
Wednesdays & Thursdays, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. |  Free Admission
Phillips@THEARC, 1801 Mississippi Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20020
 

Events DC Embassy Chef Challenge – March 7
Mark your calendar for the most exciting culinary experience of the season. Events DC hosts the ultimate celebration of global food and drink with embassy chefs engaged in friendly competition to dazzle attendees and celebrate diplomacy. Expect food and drink from around the world inside DC’s Union Station, including past winners like Barbados, Morocco and Serbia.
6 p.m. |  Tickets
Union Station, 50 Massachusetts Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20002
 

National Museum of Women in the Arts

Celebrate International Women’s Day at the National Museum of Women in the Arts – March 8
There couldn’t be a better place to spend your International Women’s Day than DC’s National Museum of Women in the Arts, which will host a slate of in-person and virtual programming. The recently renovated and expanded museum will showcase its new digs and highlight and engage with powerful work from women in the visual and performing arts through gallery talks, conversations, keynote speakers, flash tattoos and more.
10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. |  Tickets
National Museum of Women in the Arts, 1250 New York Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20005
 

RuPaul: The House of Hidden Meanings – March 8
Stripping away the artifice like never before, RuPaul’s latest memoir is a tell-all in every sense of the phrase. Even in recounting the story of his life with clarity and tenderness, the celebrity manages to maintain his signature wit and levity. RuPaul is now touring in support of the acclaimed book and will take the stage at Warner Theatre on International Women’s Day.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
Warner Theatre, 513 13th Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

Awesome Con – March 8-10
DC’s Convention Center turns into a massive celebration of geek culture during Awesome Con. More than 70,000 fans will be able to see their favorite stars from comics, films, TV, toys and games throughout Awesome Con, a three-day festival that is Washington, DC’s own Comic Con. Expect plenty of costumed attendees and an array of activities to enjoy during one of the city’s most vibrant annual events.
Tickets
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, 801 Allen Y. Lew Place NW, Washington, DC 20001 

Coastal Athletic Association (CAA) Men’s and Women’s Basketball Championships – March 8-17
Kick off March Madness with the CAA Championships at Entertainment & Sports Arena in Congress Heights. You can enjoy both the men’s tournament (March 8-12) and the women’s tournament (March 13-17) across 10 straight days of high-stakes college basketball. The winner of each competition is granted an automatic bid in the NCAA Tournament.
Tickets
Entertainment & Sports Arena, 1100 Oak Drive SE, Washington, DC 20032

 

Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice – March 8 – Sept. 8
In the mid-1940s, William H. Johnson painted his Fighters for Freedom series to honor Black activists, scientists, teachers, performers and international heads of state working to bring peace to the world. Johnson celebrated these figures – some very famous, others unsung – while acknowledging the racism, violence and oppression each one fought against. The exhibit showcases many of these paintings, including Johnson’s portraits of Harriet Tubman, George Washington Carver, Mahatma Gandhi and Marian Anderson, elevating stories that are still relevant to the struggle for social justice today.
11:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. |  Free Admission
Smithsonian American Art Museum, 8th and G Streets NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

Songbird – March 9-23
You’ll be transported to 1920s New Orleans for an uproarious musical mashup of opera and jazz thanks to a new production at the Kennedy Center. Songbird’s narrative follows the titular character and her lover, Piquillo, as they struggle through hard times. Just in time for Mardi Gras, the Mayor (in disguise) lures in Songbird, promising a life of comfort. Now she must choose between true love or financial stability. Grammy-winner Isabel Leonard portrays the fascinating heroine.
Tickets
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566
 

Quijote y Sancho Panza, nuevas andanzas – March 9-23
GALA Hispanic Theatre presents a bilingual play for audiences of all ages. The legendary Don Quixote, the gentleman from La Mancha, embarks on a new adventure with his trusted squire by his side, Sancho Panza. Prepare for fresh misadventures as the duo aim to defend the helpless, upend convention and encounter hilariously mistaken identities.
Tickets
GALA Hispanic Theatre, 3333 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20010
 

ISEKAI: Blooming Parallel Worlds – March 9 – June 1
ARTECHOUSE welcomes visitors to its seventh annual installation dedicated to celebrating the beauty of the cherry blossoms in DC. The museum treats your eyes to an exhibit inspired by the Isekai genre of Anime, allowing for the exploration of alternate universes stacked with colors, adventures and immersive technologies. Make sure to reserve tickets to this powerful digital storytelling experience.
ARTECHOUSE, 1238 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20024
 

Sleater-Kinney – March 12
Responsible for one of the great discographies in rock, Sleater-Kinney burst onto the scene in the early 1990s as part of the riot-grrrl movement and quickly gained notoriety for their blistering guitars and rhythm section. After a 10-year hiatus, the group triumphantly returned with new music in 2015 and have been playing kick-ass shows ever since.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
The Anthem, 901 Wharf Street SW, Washington, DC 20024
 

Laura Jane Grace – March 12
Responsible for some of the best punk rock of the 21st century, Laura Jane Grace began her career as the lead singer, songwriter and guitarist for Against Me!, leading the group through a string of successful LPs before launching a solo career. Now three acclaimed albums in, Grace continues to pen heartfelt, passionate, political and punk-inspired songs and her live shows are as bracing as ever.
7:30 p.m. |  Tickets
Howard Theatre, 620 T Street NW, Washington, DC 20001
 

Offset – March 12
Formerly of Migos, one of the biggest hip-hop groups of the 2010s, Offset is now a dynamic solo artist who brings his own distinctive style to any track he’s on. Last year’s album, Set It Off, debuted at no. 5 on the Billboard Top 200, speaking to Offset’s limitless crossover appeal. Now the magnetic musician hits the road in support of the album with a stop at the Fillmore Silver Spring on the docket.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
The Fillmore Silver Spring, 8656 Colesville Road, Silver Spring, MD 20910
 

Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) Men’s Basketball Tournament – March 12-16
Experience college basketball at its highest level inside DC’s Capital One Arena during the ACC Tournament. Consistently one of the most entertaining conference tournaments, expect to watch powerhouses like Duke, North Carolina, Virginia, North Carolina State, Clemson and Wake Forest take to the hardwood. The winner takes home one of the most prestigious trophies in college sports before heading to the NCAA Tournament.
Tickets
Capital One Arena, 601 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004
 

COMPANY – March 12-31
Five Tony® Awards, including Best Revival of a Musical, were awarded to this rendition of Stephen Sondheim and George Furth’s marvelous musical comedy. At Bobbie’s 35th birthday party, her friends keep pestering her about marriage, wondering why she hasn’t settled down. As our main character looks for answers, she realizes that the 21st century is enough to drive a person crazy – whether they’re single, married or simply alive.
Tickets
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566
 

At the Wedding – March 13 – April 21
Studio Theatre stages another thought-provoking play, taking the audience to the most dramatic of settings: a wedding. Carlo crashes the proceedings, hoping to avoid drinking, making kids cry and embarrassing herself in front of her ex, who just so happens to be the bride. As you may guess, Carlo has a tough time accomplishing her goals in this hilarious production.
Tickets
Studio Theatre, 1501 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20005
 

National Gallery Nights: Color Theory – March 14
The National Gallery of Art’s East Building transforms into a multicolored, after-hours celebration for its first National Gallery Night of the season. Enjoy performances inspired by the colors of the rainbow, marvel at Mark Rothko: Paintings on Paper, participate in art-making activities inspired by Rothko and the Washington Color School, take in pop-up talks with Libby Rasmussen and museum experts and make your own color wheel with a scavenger hunt of works by women artists.
6 p.m. |  Free Admission |  Register
National Gallery of Art’s East Building, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20565
 

Duke Ellington Orchestra Featuring Lisa Fischer – March 15
For more than 100 years, the Duke Ellington Orchestra has performed all over the world under the guidance of Ellington’s family. The brilliant group will swing its way through numerous jazz classics from the Ellington songbook during this show at the Kennedy Center. The Orchestra will be joined by singer/songwriter Lisa Fischer, who’s also known for her outstanding work as a backup singer for The Rolling Stones.
7 p.m. & 9 p.m. |  Tickets
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566
 

Danny Brown – March 15
Never one to be caught standing still, Danny Brown has become much more than a rapper after more than a decade in the limelight. Actor, show host, producer, activist, comedian; there’s nary a role that the multitalented musician can’t fill. He’s fresh off his most personal album, Quaranta, meaning this tour promises to be filled with his most honest performances.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
Howard Theatre, 620 T Street NW, Washington, DC 20001
 

Pink Tie Party – March 15
The annual dinner raises funds for the National Cherry Blossom Festival, ensuring events remain primarily free and open to the public. The elaborate cocktail party brings on the fun with lots of features: spring-inspired cuisine, a silent auction, live music and dancing. Tickets to this event are limited and guests must be 21 and over to attend.
More Info

Union Station, 50 Massachusetts Ave NE, Washington, DC 20002

 

Little Shop of Horrors – March 15 – May 18
Originally a sci-fi/horror comedy film released in 1960, Little Shop of Horrors then became an off-Broadway musical in the early 1980s. Yet another film adaptation followed a few years later, showing how this timeless story of a floral shop assistant and his singing, deadly plant will always dazzle audiences. The historic Ford’s Theatre revives the dynamic production during its upcoming spring season. Make sure to use code DDCSHOP20 for 20% off your tickets to the show (valid for March 16 - April 6 & May 1-18; limit two tickets per purchase)!
Tickets
Ford's Theatre, 511 10th Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

Change Your Game – Opens March 15
The National Museum of American History’s Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention developed a new exhibit filled with interactive elements that highlight the intersection of invention, sports and technology. Items on display include a prototype of the Jogbra from the 1970s, a football helmet with Crash Cloud prototype to help protect the brain, a Hawk-Eye camera used during the pandemic by the U.S. Open to automate line calls and prostheses that made extreme sports possible for athletes with amputations.
10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. |  Free Admission
Smithsonian National Museum of American History, 1300 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20560

 

Sewn in America: Making, Meaning, Memory – March 15 – Dec. 31
The DAR Museum presents a groundbreaking exhibit featuring sewn items from every textile section of its collections including clothing, household items, needlework and quilts. Sewn in America examines how the activity shaped gender roles, from the homestead to professions like dressmaking, tailoring and factory work. Pieces from the 18th century to today will be juxtaposed to show how women of diverse backgrounds have used needles to express emotions and battle injustice.
Hours |  Free Admission
DAR Museum, 1776 D Street NW, Washington, DC 20006

 

Capital Comedy Festival – March 16
Inject gut-busting laughs into your spring calendar by attending this annual comedy festival held at DAR Constitution Hall. The evening will be packed with Black comedic talent including Sommore, Lavel Crawford (known for his role as Huell Babineaux in Breaking Bad), Don D.C. Curry and Huggy Lowdown.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
DAR Constitution Hall, 1776 D Street NW, Washington, DC 20006

 

ExPats Theatre: Migraaaaants or There’s Too Many People on This Damn Boat – March 16 – April 7
The Atlas Performing Arts Center presents a satirical perspective on the lives of migrants from ExPats Theatre. You’ll follow migrants as they deal with profiteers, attempt to cross the sea and navigate the cultural landscapes of where they end up. Along the way, the audience will uncover the human element of the migration issue.
Tickets
Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H Street NE, Washington, DC 20002

 

Imagined Neighbors: Japanese Visions of China, 1680-1980 – March 16 – Sept. 3
From 1603-1868 during what is known as the Edo period in feudal Japan, many of the country’s artists combined their limited knowledge of China with their own imaginations to create breathtaking works of painting and calligraphy. Once modernization set in during the Meiji era (1868-1912), Chinese art and culture remained a touchstone for Japanese artists, even through imperialism and war.
10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Museum of Asian Art, 1050 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20560

 

Woven Histories: Textiles and Modern Abstraction – March 17 – July 28
The National Gallery of Art dives deep on the overlap between fashion, design, arts and crafts. Through 160 works including oil paintings, weaving, basketry, knotting and knitting, you can see how textiles have influenced modern artists and movements. The exhibit also showcases moments when social and political issues activated textile production and artmaking with heightened focus and urgency.
10 a.m. – 5 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Gallery of Art, 6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC

 

Tempestuous Elements – Through March 17
Arena Stage's February marquee reveals the struggle of Anna Julia Cooper, a Black teacher who fought for her students’ rights to an advanced curriculum. In a scandal concocted by the government, her time as principal of DC's historic M Street School was sabotaged by her colleagues and neighbors. Witness the journey of this formidable Black feminist’s fight for educational equity and legitimacy at the turn of the 20th century.
Tickets
Arena Stage, 1101 6th Street SW, Washington, DC 20024

 

National Cherry Blossom Festival – March 18 – April 14
DC celebrates the blooming of cherry trees with a month-long festival that commemorates the 1912 gift from Mayor Yukio Ozaki of Tokyo to the city. Peak bloom is predicted for March 23-26 (more on that below). Check out popular festival events in the lead-up to the celebration, in addition to our guide to the celebration, how to get the most popular blossom spots and the best places to snap photos.
 

Lulu's Wine Garden

Spring Wine Fling – March 19-31
Restaurant Association Metropolitan Washington spruces up spring with special discounts at participating restaurants all over the District. Spring Wine Fling means you get a two-course meal and two glasses of wine for just $55 per person, which adds up to tremendous value during one of the most vibrant times of the year in DC.
 

Damian & Stephen Marley – March 20
As the sons of Bob Marley, both Damian and Stephen had large shoes to fill on the music front. Both have done so with flying colors, each creating their own distinctive sounds and careers while following in their father’s footsteps. Now, the duo hits the road together for the Traffic Jam tour, which fortunately includes The Fillmore Silver Spring as one of its stops.
8:30 p.m. |  Tickets
The Fillmore Silver Spring, 8656 Colesville Road, Silver Spring, MD 20910

 

National Cherry Blossom Festival

National Cherry Blossom Festival

Petal Porches – March 20 – April 14
Petal Porches presented by Amazon asks participants to decorate their porches in cherry blossom style from March 20 through April 14. Residents can register now to add their homes to the Petal Porches map and participate in friendly decorating competitions for prizes. Festival-goers will be encouraged to #SpringTogether in DC by admiring Petal Porches across the area based on registered locations. For more information, including the official map of locations and registration details, visit the festival's website.
 

Art in Bloom – March 20 – April 14

Custom cherry blossom public art sculptures will be placed at distinct locations all over the DC metro area as part of Art In Bloom presented by Amazon. Challenge your friends and family to discover all of them across the four-week celebration and make sure to post your poses with the pieces on social media using the hashtag #ArtInBloom. Check the Festival’s website for updates on the promotion.

 

José Andrés & Friends: The Zaytinya Cookbook of Mezze Madness – March 21
See a DC icon like you’ve never seen him before at the Lincoln Theatre. Chef José Andrés will host an evening filled with cooking, interviews and live music in celebration of his new cookbook, Zaytinya: Delicious Mediterranean Dishes of Greece, Turkey, and Lebanon, which features recipes from the popular DC restaurant. José will also welcome friends to the stage for a live recording of his podcast, Longer Tables.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
Lincoln Theatre, 1215 U Street NW, Washington, DC 20009

 

Jon Batiste – March 21
As a five-time Grammy winner and 20-time nominee, Jon Batiste’s credentials speak for themselves. The Renaissance man has released soulful solo albums, composed music for the movie Soul (for which he won an Oscar, a Grammy, a Golden Globe and a BAFTA) and has even served as bandleader and musical director for The Late Show with Stephen Colbert (2015-22). Needless to say, Batiste’s show at the Warner Theatre will be a hot ticket.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
Warner Theatre, 513 13th Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

Kim Gordon – March 22
The seeds of modern alternative rock were planted by Kim Gordon and her group, Sonic Youth, in grimy clubs in New York City in the early 1980s. Nearly four decades later, Gordon continues to produce visionary work, now as a solo artist. Her latest tour in support of The Collective (which will be released on March 8) touches down at Black Cat in DC for one night only.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
Black Cat, 1811 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009

 

National Cherry Blossom Festival

National Cherry Blossom Festival

National Cherry Blossom Festival Opening Ceremony – March 23

The National Cherry Blossom Festival and the Japan Foundation join together to bring an exciting opening ceremony to the Warner Theatre. The spectacle features performers from DC and Japan. Early access to tickets to this epic spring celebration can be obtained by signing up for the festival's email list. The event will also be livestreamed on the festival's YouTube channel.

5-6:30 p.m. |  More Info

 

Peak Bloom Prediction of the Cherry Blossoms – March 23-26
The National Park Service announced its prediction of peak bloom for the cherry blossoms for March 23-26. Peak bloom occurs when 70% of the Yoshino cherry blossom trees at the Tidal Basin have fully opened. Good to Know: Cold, windy, rainy or snowy weather may alter peak bloom forecasts, and also affect how long the blossoms will stay on the trees after they've bloomed. If you're traveling to DC to see the blossoms, keep an eye on the National Park Service's Bloom Watch to get the most accurate forecast.
Citywide

 

Harlem Globetrotters – March 23
Your favorite Globetrotter stars will show off their amazing basketball skills, roof-raising athleticism and make the entire family laugh the whole time as their new world tour visits Capital One Arena in downtown DC. Watch as the men and women of the legendary Globetrotters go head-to-head against the Washington Generals, who will stop at nothing to try and defeat the team that never loses.
1 p.m. |  Tickets
Capital One Arena, 601 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

Staging the Supernatural: Ghosts and the Theater in Japanese Prints – March 23 – Oct. 6
The Japanese Edo period (1603–1868) gave credence to essential ideas about the supernatural in Japanese culture. Many of the beliefs that came to prominence during this time are still held as conventional wisdom today. This exhibit at the National Museum of Asian Art allows you to explore the roles that ghosts and spirits play in the retelling of Japanese legends as well as real events. Staging the Supernatural features woodblock prints and illustrated books that showcase the spooky specters that haunt the Japanese theater traditions of noh and kabuki.
10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Museum of Asian Art, 1050 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20560

 

The Lehman Trilogy – Feb. 22 – March 24
Three actors portray various generations of the Lehman family in the 2022 Tony Award winner for Best Play. What begins as three immigrants attempting to live their American dream turns into a disaster for future generations, which eventually leads to the biggest financial crisis in U.S. history. Edward Gero, Mark Nelson and René Thornton, Jr. give unforgettable performances across 160 years of family history.
Tickets
Sidney Harman Hall, 610 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

The Armed – March 25
A hardcore punk collective that have transcended the genre since forming in 2009, The Armed weave in elements of pop, shoegaze, metal and funk to create epic albums and unforgettable live shows. The group, which features a rotating cast of collaborators, has received widespread acclaim for their thoughtful and political lyrics and highly intellectual approach. Expect plenty of energy inside Black Cat for this show.
7:30 p.m. |  Tickets
Black Cat, 1811 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009

 

Zach Bryan – March 25
Perhaps the brightest star in country music right now, Zach Bryan will play to a packed house at Capital One Arena while accompanied by special guests The Middle East and Levi Turner. Bryan’s recent eponymous album topped the Billboard charts upon release, marking the singer/songwriter’s rise from YouTube star to worldwide sensation.
7 p.m. |  Tickets
Capital One Arena, 601 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

Hip Hop & Jazz Festival – March 27 – April 19
The Kennedy Center launches a new festival that focuses on how hip-hop intersects with other musical forms, genres and disciplines. Hip Hop & … “is dedicated to celebrating the multi-hyphenate”, highlighting the myriad of ways in which hip hop influences the culture at-large. For the inaugural showcase, the Center puts hip hop and jazz together for weeks of programming that celebrates the relationship between the two, including listening sessions, live music performances, dance parties and so much more.
More Info
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566

 

Dowrong, Part Carbon & Grimm Winter – March 28
Head down to The Wharf for some live music on a Thursday night as spring kicks into gear. Three local indie bands will take the stage at Pearl Street Warehouse, a great place to hang out, grab a beer and see a show. Dowrong, Part Carbon and Grimm Winter have all built loyal followings around the District. Tickets are just $15.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
Pearl Street Warehouse, 33 Pearl Street SW, Washington, DC 20024

 

Mosaic Theater: Nancy – March 28 – April 21
The Atlas Performing Arts Center turns into a time machine to 1985 thanks to a new play presented by Mosaic Theater and written by award-winning playwright Rhiana Yazzie. Nancy concerns one Nancy Reagan (yep, that one), who’s steering her husband’s decisions from the Oval Office according to astrological signs, and Esmeralda, a Navajo mother standing up for her community. When Nancy’s familial connection to Pocahontas is discovered, a captivating adventure unfolds filled with humor, heart and empathy.
Tickets
Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H Street NE, Washington, DC 20002

 

Pattern and Paradox: The Quilts of Amish Women – March 28 – Sept. 2
Learn about the fascinating connection between Amish Women and quilting thanks to a new exhibit at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Over time, the practice has transcended its utilitarian roots and become a form of artistic expression for Amish Women. Treat your eyes to a wondrous mix of colors and patterns as you marvel at the innovation of extraordinary quilts.
11:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. |  Free Admission
Smithsonian American Art Museum, 8th and G Streets NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

A Conversation with Larry David – March 29
The Anthem welcomes the crankiest cultural icon of all-time. As the co-creator of Seinfeld and the creator and star of Curb Your Enthusiasm, Larry David has left an imprint on comedy that few others can match in the history of entertainment. We think he’ll have a few interesting things to share during this chat at The Anthem, which is perfectly timed, as it takes place nine days before the series finale of Curb. 
7:30 p.m. |  Tickets
The Anthem, 901 Wharf Street SW, Washington, DC 20024

 

Steve Aoki – March 29
An icon of electronic dance music, Steve Aoki has transcended the genre and achieved worldwide success. Echostage, one of DC’s premier venues and the ideal setting for one of Aoki’s shows, will host the DJ/producer/musician. Aoki has legions of fans around the world, so expect a packed house and dancing that will shake the floor.
9 p.m. |  Tickets
Echostage, 2135 Queens Chapel Road NE, Washington, DC 20018

 

Unknown Soldier – March 29 – May 5
Arena Stage welcomes an elegiac musical that concerns Ellen Rabinowitz, who discovers a photo of an anonymous soldier while cleaning out her grandmother’s home. Daniel Goldstein and the late Michael Friedman penned this captivating tale of a woman’s journey to uncover the secrets of her family’s past, inevitably leading her towards the future.
Tickets
Arena Stage, 1101 6th Street SW, Washington, DC 20024

 

NCBF Kite Festival

Blossom Kite Festival – March 30
Head to the Washington Monument grounds for this free kite-flying extravaganza, one of the most highly anticipated events of the National Cherry Blossom Festival, presented by Amazon. The entire family can watch expert kite fliers from all over the world, whether enjoying the event near the Monument or at a featured park. More information is available on the Festival's website.
 

Loudon Wainwright III – March 30
Since emerging as one of folk music’s zaniest characters in the 1970s, Loudoun Wainwright III has recorded 27 albums, starred in TV shows and films, performed his own one-man show, composed scores for major motion pictures, written a memoir and managed to keep his fans interested every step of the way. You’re lucky to have a chance to see such a legend for free on Kennedy Center’s Millennium Stage.
6 p.m. |  Register
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566

 

Robert Glasper – Black Radio: A Duke x Dilla Celebration – March 30
Five-time Grammy winner Robert Glasper, who’s also a founding member of the Kennedy Center’s Hip Hop Culture Council, hosts a special celebration in honor of Duke Ellington’s 150th birthday and the late great J. Dilla’s 50th. The one-night-only tribute to the musical legacies of two icons features Glasper along with the Black Radio Orchestra led by two-time Grammy winner Derrick Hodge.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566

 

Mark Rothko: Paintings on Paper – Through March 31
Known for his abstract paintings on canvas (some of which can be seen at the Phillips Collection in DC), Mark Rothko also crafted more than 1,000 paintings on paper over the course of his illustrious, decades-long career. The National Gallery of Art will showcase more than 100 of these tableaus, many of which will be on view to the public for the first time, making for a unique opportunity to see new work from one of the most important artists of the 20th century.
10 a.m. – 5 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Gallery of Art, 6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC

 

Dorothea Lange: Seeing People – Through March 31
The National Gallery of Art showcases roughly 100 images from one of the greatest photographers ever live in a new exhibit on Dorothea Lange. Seeing People will examine Lange’s prolific and trailblazing career through the lens of portraiture and her exceptional ability to capture the character, resilience, heartbreak, joy, wonder and beauty of her human subjects.
10 a.m. – 5 p.m. |  Free admission
National Gallery of Art, 6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC

 

One Life: Frederick Douglass – Through April 21
Activist, writer, speaker, intellectual – Frederick Douglass was one of the most influential people of 19th century America, making him one of the most influential figures in the history of the country. The National Portrait Gallery celebrates the icon, who befriended and advised Abraham Lincoln, through a series of prints, photographs and ephemera.
11:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Portrait Gallery, 8th and G Streets NW, Washington, DC 20001

 

Ancestral Places: People of African Descent at Tudor Place – Through April 21
Tudor Place will be outfitted to showcase the historic house from the perspective of the enslaved and free individuals who worked and lived on the property. Through maps, artifacts, photos and audio recordings, visitors will be educated on the ways these individuals dealt with everyday life at Tudor Place as well as how they practiced resistance and activism.
Register
Tudor Place, 1644 31st Street NW, Washington, DC 20007

 

In the Library: Latin American Architecture in Circulation – Through April 26
Defined as the years 1450-1800, the early modern period saw transformation across the world – both violent and otherwise. In that vast exchange of people, culture, objects and ideas, Latin America’s architecture became a synergy of Indigenous and cultural traditions. The National Gallery of Art’s Library displays more than 30 pieces, including wonders such as Mexico City’s Metropolitan Cathedral and Guatemala’s temples of Tikal.
11 a.m. – 4 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Gallery of Art, 6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC

 

Atlas Intersections Festival – Through April 27
The Atlas Performing Arts Center presents work that impacts society, culture and the world through the annual Intersections Festival. Engage with excellent art that inspires a connected community from artists that hail from all over the DMV area. You can see stunning performances in dance, music, theater, art, ballet and other disciplines throughout the festival’s run.
More Info
Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H Street NE, Washington, DC 20002

 

The Future of Orchids: Conservation and Collaboration – Through April 28
The Smithsonian American Art Museum features 200 varieties of orchids in the Robert and Arlene Kogod Courtyard during a special exhibition. Organized by Smithsonian Gardens in collaboration with the U.S. Botanic Garden, visitors can admire living collections and a series of newly commissioned and loaned paintings and sculptures by multimedia artist Phaan Howng. The exhibit also highlights the challenges facing wild orchids today and examines the work done by conservationists to protect the flower.
11:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. |  Free Admission
Smithsonian American Art Museum, 8th and G Streets NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

Jennifer Bartlett: In and Out of the Garden – Feb. 10 – April 30
One of the most ambitious projects of Jennifer Bartlett’s career is the centerpiece of the latest exhibit at The Phillips Collection. During a 1979-80 winter stay at a friend’s rented house in Nice, France, Bartlett embarked on what would turn into a years-long quest to depict a small, rundown garden on the property from literally hundreds of perspectives. Known for her rigorous combination of mathematical elements, abstract expressionism and minimalism, Bartlett’s artistic interpretations of the garden evolved from freehand drawings to paintings on steel plates, canvas and glass, many of which are featured in the exhibition.
Hours & Admission
The Phillips Collection, 1600 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20009

 

Whistler: Streetscapes, Urban Change – Through May 4
The National Museum of Asian Art’s renowned collection of works by James McNeill Whistler inform this exhibition that explores European cities in an era of rapid change. Streetscapes, Urban Change showcases oil paintings, watercolors, pastels and prints, some of which are on some on view at the museum for the first time. Visitors will be able to experience the American expatriate artist’s fascination with the stunning growth and transformation of major cities at the end of the 19th century.
10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Museum of Asian Art, 1050 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20560

 

Shaun the Sheep: Flock This Way – Through May 12
The popular British animated series, Shaun the Sheep, partnered with the National Children’s Museum on an interactive exhibit that builds problem-solving and motor skills while also exploring literacy and technology. Kids can mix up Shaun’s pal Bitzer’s face to create new expressions, create stop motion animation with items from the scrap heap, hop in a truck and rescue a member of the flock in the top of a tree and much, much more.
Tickets & Admission
National Children’s Museum, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

The Anxious Eye: German Expressionism and Its Legacy –  Through May 27
One of the 20th century’s most important artistic movements takes center stage at the National Gallery of Art. German Expressionists who first came to prominence in the early part of the 20th century are featured throughout, including Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Erich Heckel and Emil Nolde. Their influence can be registered through the contemporary pieces in the exhibition, including work by Leonard Baskin, Nicole Eisenman and Orit Hofshi. In total, visitors can marvel at more than 70 prints, drawings, illustrated books, portfolios and sculptures.
10 a.m. – 5 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Gallery of Art, 6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC

 

Jessica Diamond: Wheel of Life – Through June 2
One of America’s greatest conceptual artists presents her largest museum installation to date at the Hirshhorn. Wheel of Life fills the museum’s second-floor, inner-circle galleries with 15 text-and-image-based works that highlight Diamond’s inventiveness. Much of the work on display reflects on Diamond’s stunning 40-year career as an artist.
10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. |  Free admission
Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden, Independence Avenue & 7th Street NW, Washington, DC 20560

 

Robert Houle: Red is Beautiful – Through June 2
The National Museum of the American Indian presents the first major retrospective dedicated to Robert Houle (Saulteaux Anishinaabe, Sandy Bay First Nation, b. 1947), an Indigenous artist known for masterfully blending Western and ancient traditions in his contemporary works. Visitors can marvel at more than 50 years of Houle’s creativity, including paintings pierced by porcupine quills and historic scenes reimagined from an Indigenous perspective.
10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Museum of the American Indian, 4th Street & Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20560

 

Composing Color: Paintings by Alma Thomas – Through June 2
Alma Thomas, who lived in DC and worked at Howard University for many years, developed a style all her own as a painter. She took to abstract painting late in her own life and at a crucial period in the country’s history, as political turmoil dramatically impacted the mid-1960s. The Smithsonian American Art Museum, which possesses the largest public collection of Thomas’ art, will offer an intimate look at her creative evolution from 1959 to 1978 through her signature color-driven pieces.
11:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. |  Free Admission
Smithsonian American Art Museum, 8th and G Streets NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

Duty, Honor, Country: Antebellum Portraits of West Pointers – Through June 9
In the lead up to the Civil War, the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, emerged as a training ground for men who built the nation’s infrastructure, played important roles in its military campaigns and took part in its politics. Drawn exclusively from the Gallery’s collection, the exhibition will feature early camera portraits of Ulysses S. Grant, George Armstrong Custer, John Pelham, “Stonewall” Jackson and Gouverneur Kemble Warren, among many others.
11:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Portrait Gallery, 8th and G Streets NW, Washington, DC 20001

 

Forces of Nature: Voices that Shaped Environmentalism – Through Sept. 2
The National Portrait Gallery honors key scientists, politicians, activists, writers and artists who influenced attitudes toward the environment in the U.S. from the late-1800s to the present. Trace the environmentalist movement from turn-of-the-20th-century conservationism to mid-20th-century political actions and the backlash to them. It also addresses the current state of environmental justice, biodiversity and climate. Gaze at more than 25 portraits of figures like Rachel Carson, George Washington Carver, Maya Lin, Henry David Thoreau and Edward O. Wilson.
11:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Portrait Gallery, 8th and G Streets NW, Washington, DC 20001

 

Park Chan-kyong: Gathering – Through Oct. 13
The Seoul-based Park Chan-kyong has gained international recognition for photography and film that has been unflinching in its examination of the history of modern Korea. The National Museum of Asian Art will showcase the first solo presentation of his work in a major U.S. museum. The exhibition features images that highlight the artists’ masterful use of the camera to capture tradition, history and disaster in a contemporary society.
10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Museum of Asian Art, 1050 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20560

 

 

Conversations: Kerry James Marshall and John Singleton Copley – Through Jan. 31, 2025
The National Gallery of Art opens its second installation as part of the Conversations series, which focuses on three masterpieces from artists working nearly two centuries apart. An 18th century canvas by John Singleton Copley and two 20th century works by Kerry James Marshall each address the horrors of the Middle Passage and the transatlantic slave trade. Visitors can consider each in a shared exhibition space for the first time.
10 a.m. – 5 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Gallery of Art, 6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC

 

Isaac Julien: Lessons of the Hour – Frederick Douglass – Through Nov. 26, 2026
The first joint acquisition of the National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum (the two share a building) is Sir Isaac Julien’s fascinating moving image installation, which blends period reenactments across give screens to give the viewer insight into the life, accomplishments, activism and brilliance of Frederick Douglass (1818-1895).
11:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. |  Free Admission
National Portrait Gallery, 8th and G Streets NW, Washington, DC 20001

 

Entertainment Nation – Ongoing
The National Museum of American History’s incredible ongoing exhibit covers 150 years of American culture through an array of interactive elements as well as a collection of items that will leave you stunned. Very cool artifacts like the Ruby Red slippers from The Wizard of Oz and a guitar played by Prince are centerpieces, but other displays cover sports, television, comedy and so much more.
10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. |  Free Admission
Smithsonian National Museum of American History, 1300 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20560

 

John Akomfrah: Five Murmurations – Ongoing
Artist and filmmaker John Akomfrah addresses the COVID-19 pandemic, the murder of George Floyd and worldwide protests in support of Black Lives Matter in a visual essay to define our turbulent times. Utilizing an image archive filled with seminal works of art and scenes shot during the fraught 18-month period between 2019 and 2021, Five Murmurations features insights into post-colonialism, diasporic experience and the concept of collective memory.
10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. |  Free Admission
Smithsonian National Museum of African Art, 950 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20560

 

Mini Memories: Souvenir Buildings from the David Weingarten Collection – Ongoing
Mementos, keepsakes and souvenirs. Whatever you choose to call them, objects can often contain added significance based on the memories they conjure. The National Building Museum dials into this notion with a new exhibit entirely focused on souvenir buildings, culled from a collection of more than 3,000 miniatures. The 400 structures on view include a wide range of detailed recreations, from architectural wonders to factories, and visitors will learn how these souvenirs are made and how they’re used.
Hours & Tickets
National Building Museum, 401 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

 

Georges Adéagbo’s Create to Free Yourselves: Abraham Lincoln and the History of Freeing Slaves in America 
The Smithsonian National Museum of African Art partnered with President Lincoln’s Cottage in 2022 to commission an installation by Beninois artist Georges Adéagbo. The resulting piece is the artist’s compelling vision for us. Adéagbo’s creation, which will be on display as part of the museum’s collection beginning Nov. 18, invites the viewer to consider the legacy of Abraham Lincoln, prompting reflections on the unfinished journey toward freedom for all in America.
10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. |  Free Admission
Smithsonian National Museum of African Art, 950 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20560

 

Building Stories 
The National Building Museum invites your family to embark on an immersive exploration of architecture, construction, engineering and design found in children’s books. Curated by children’s literature expert Leonard Marcus, Building Stories marks the first national exhibition to showcase the built environment’s role as an essential character in formative tales of our collective youth. Expect plenty of interactive elements.
Hours & Admission
National Building Museum, 401 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

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